Archive
2020-2011
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010-2001
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000-1991
2000
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
1990-1981
1990
1989
1988
1987
1986
1985
1984
1983
1982
1981
  • Dirk Bell: Eyelashes From Inside The Aquarium, 2013, Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles, Photo: Tobias Hübel
  • Dirk Bell: Eyelashes From Inside The Aquarium, 2013, Detail, Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles, Photo: Tobias Hübel
  • Juliette Blightman: Always there is a desire that impels and a convention that restrains..., 2013, Courtesy the artist and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin, Photo: Tobias Hübel
  • (in the front): Shannon Bool: Broken Pole, 2010, Courtesy Galerie Kadel Willborn; (at the wall) Shannon Bool: The Lipps. 24 Horizontal Pouts, 2013, Collection Philara Dusseldorf. Photo: Tobias Hübel
  • (on the left) Dirk Bell: Eyelashes From Inside The Aquarium, 2013, Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles; (on the right) Marlo Pascual: Untitled, 2011, Courtesy Saatchi Gallery, London, Photo: Tobias Hübel
  • (on the left) Verena Issel: Abenteuer reisender Frauen, 2011/2012; (in the middle) Verena Issel: o.T. (female career), 2012, Courtesy the artist; (on the right) Judith Blightman: Always there is a desire that impels and a convention that restrains..., 2013, Courtesy the artist and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin, Photo: Tobias Hübel
  • (on the left) Shannon Bool: The Lipps. 24 Horizontal Pouts, 2013, Collection Philara Dusseldorf; (in the middle) Shannon Bool: Broken Pole, 2010, Courtesy Galerie Kadel Willborn; (on the right) Dirk Stewen: Untitled (Soft corps XXXI), 2013, Courtesy the artist, Maureen Paley and Karin Guenther, Photo: Tobias Hübel
  • Maria Loboda: Curious and cold epicurean young ladies, 2011, Courtesy the artist and SCHLEICHER/LANGE, Photo: Tobias Hübel
  • Girls Can Tell, installation view GAK Bremen 2013, Photo: Tobias Hübel
  • Dirk Bell: God Help The Be(a)st In Me, Collection of Blake Byrne, Los Angeles, Foto: Tobias Hübel
  • Anna Ostoya: Untitled (Scroll), 2011, Courtesy the artist and Silberkuppe, Berlin, Photo: Tobias Hübel

Girls Can Tell

more images >
28.09.2013–02.02.2014

Nobody would seriously maintain that feminism’s urgent issues have been solved through lived social equality. It could, however, be the case that the focal points of feminism have shifted. What the Feminist Movement in the 1970’s and later the Punks in the 1980’s fought for has at least in part become a social reality, and that has lead to other issues taking centre stage. Accordingly, contact and interaction with early feminists and their doctrines has shifted significantly––for the generations born after 1970, the necessity of constantly standing up for feminist viewpoints has given way to a natural consciousness and to an omnipresent “live with it” feeling. The art theorist Monika Szewczyk speaks of a “profound absorption of those lessons of feminism that allows us to proceed without naming what we do––a pause in the forging of weapons in order to use them.” (1)

That in no way means that the social need for a feministic attitude no longer exists today. However, it can be stated that the tone of its expressions has changed. That they have perhaps––should one dare to say––become lighter, without having lost precision. That a tone has been established that is sufficiently sovereign to allow for occasional doubts in feminist doctrines without immediately smelling the scent of treason against its fundamental idea. Moreover we have reached a point where emancipation is no longer an issue for women alone; men are increasingly engaging with issues relating to it.

The group exhibition “Girls can tell” (2) displays works by a generation of artists born after 1970 that exemplify the shifted interaction with feminist issues in contemporary art. There are often feminist undertones, and at time feminist issues are expressed subliminally through the use of materials and techniques and employ a certain elegance of form and light aesthetic in order “to use these weapons.” Approaching this field from diverse perspectives, the works presented in “Girls can tell” traverse a terrain of media which encompasses painting, photography, drawing, installation, ready-made work, film and sculpture.

(1) Monika Szewczyk. “Flirting with Feminism”, in exh. cat. Shannon Bool. Inverted Harem, CRAC Alsace, GAK Gesellschaft für Aktuelle Kunst Bremen and Bonner Kunstverein, 2011, p. 12.

(2) The title of this exhibition refers to an album by American rock band Spoon from 2001.

Read more
28.09.2013–02.02.2014

Dirk Bell
Juliette Blightman
Shannon Bool
Kajsa Dahlberg
Nina Hoffmann
Verena Issel
Maria Loboda
Anna Ostoya
Marlo Pascual
Seb Patane
Jeremy Shaw
Dirk Stewen
Susanne M. Winterling

Curated by
Janneke de Vries

Publication

Girls can tell (exh. cat., ed. J. de Vries, GAK, 2014)

Annual editions

Juliette Blightman: A bird in hand, is worth two in the bush, 2016

Kajsa Dahlberg: Ett eget rum / Tusen bibliotek, 2013 und Ein Zimmer für sich / Ein eigenes Zimmer / Ein Zimmer für sich allein / Vierhundertdreiunddreißig Bibliotheken, 2011

Verena Issel: These Kids are not ok / Design löst Probleme, 2014

Events

Fri 27.09.13, 7 pm
Opening

Thu 17.10.13, 7 pm
Guided tour with Janneke de Vries

Thu 31.10.13, 7 pm
Angelika Bartl: Feminist Perspectives and Documentary Video Art
Lecture

Thu 21.11.13, 7 pm
Annika Larsson and Yvonne Bialek
Film screening and interview (en)

Thu 28.11.13, 7 pm
Monika Szewczyk: Flirting with Feminism
Lecture (en)

Thu 12.12.13, 7 pm
Guided tour with Janneke de Vries

Thu 23.01.14, 7 pm
Julia Voss: Gentleman’s Club Modernism. Why Art History Has to Be Rewritten
Lecture

Support

The Senator for Culture, Free Hanseatic City of Bremen, Karin and Uwe Hollweg Foundation, Waldemar Koch Foundation

Back to top